Week 20 - Composition: Negative Space

“I'm filling in all the negative spaces with positively everything.” - Edie Brickell

Create a powerful landscape using Negative Space. #dogwoodweek20 #2019dogwood52 #dogwood52

Create a powerful landscape using Negative Space. #dogwoodweek20 #2019dogwood52 #dogwood52

French Friday: Saint-Étienne-du-Mont | Purple Doors + Magic Steps

“This is unbelievable! Look at this! There's no city like this in the world. There never was…Imagine this town in the '20s. Paris in the '20s, in the rain. The artists and writers…” - Gil Pender, Midnight in Paris

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Imagine sitting on these steps when the clock strikes midnight…

Imagine sitting on these steps when the clock strikes midnight…

You look down this street to see a vintage Peugeot approaching. The car pulls over to invite you into Paris of the 1920s — Hemingway, Scott and Zelda, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, Dali, Josephine Baker, Man Ray…

You look down this street to see a vintage Peugeot approaching. The car pulls over to invite you into Paris of the 1920s — Hemingway, Scott and Zelda, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, Dali, Josephine Baker, Man Ray…

Completed in 1626, the church of Saint-Étienne-du-Mont is located around the corner from the Panthéon on the top of la Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the 5th arrondissement. In addition to the magical steps, the church contains the tombs of St. Blaise, Jean Racine, and Jean-Paul Marat.

Completed in 1626, the church of Saint-Étienne-du-Mont is located around the corner from the Panthéon on the top of la Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the 5th arrondissement. In addition to the magical steps, the church contains the tombs of St. Blaise, Jean Racine, and Jean-Paul Marat.

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The church is mentioned in Hemingway’s  A Moveable Feast:  "I walked past the Lycée Henri Quatre and the ancient church of St-Etienne-du-Mont and the windswept Place du Panthéon." Seems like Woody Allen did his homework!

The church is mentioned in Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast: "I walked past the Lycée Henri Quatre and the ancient church of St-Etienne-du-Mont and the windswept Place du Panthéon." Seems like Woody Allen did his homework!

Week 18 - Inspiration: Weight or Mass

"Let me be light as a feather — strong, with purpose, yet light at heart; able to bend, and, tho I might become frayed, able to pull myself together again." - Anita Sams

Heavy as a stone or light as a feather: I love the gravity of the blocks of battered slippers juxtaposed with the ethereal tutu. #2019dogwood52 #dogwood52 #dogwoodweek18

Heavy as a stone or light as a feather: I love the gravity of the blocks of battered slippers juxtaposed with the ethereal tutu. #2019dogwood52 #dogwood52 #dogwoodweek18

Week 16 - Storytelling: Shadow

“My shadow in my art is one way I trace who I was and where I have been. My shadow and I have been on a journey for quite a while now!” - Angela Cartwright

#2019dogwood52 #dogwood52 #dogwoodweek16

#2019dogwood52 #dogwood52 #dogwoodweek16

Notre Dame de Paris

« Notre-Dame est aujourd'hui déserte, inanimée, morte. On sent qu'il y a quelque chose de disparu. Ce corps immense est vide; c'est un squelette; l'esprit l'a quitté, on en voit la place, et voilà tout. » Victor Hugo, Notre-Dame de Paris (1831).

I have marveled at her breathtaking architecture and climbed her bell tower to take in the stunning views. I have worshiped here during Advent and Lent, during Holy Week and on Easter Sunday, and even just because the bells summoned me to light a candle for my mom, dad, and grandma. And each time I visit, I stand upon Point Zéro knowing that I will return to her again.  Yet, one hundred eighty-eight years after the publication of Notre Dame de Paris, Victor Hugo’s ominous words feel eerily true again tonight. Today, as I watched the Cathedral burn, the Gothic spire fall, and the medieval roof collapse, I cried for the destruction of history, art, and sacred space. Today, as I answered concerned texts, phone calls, emails, and social media messages from friends and former students near and far, my heart swelled with love and appreciation. Tonight, as I watched the news that the structure and much of the artwork of the Cathedral has been saved and that, once again, just as in the time of Victor Hugo, the faithful of the world will unite to restore this spiritual and cultural treasure, I am hopeful.

I have marveled at her breathtaking architecture and climbed her bell tower to take in the stunning views. I have worshiped here during Advent and Lent, during Holy Week and on Easter Sunday, and even just because the bells summoned me to light a candle for my mom, dad, and grandma. And each time I visit, I stand upon Point Zéro knowing that I will return to her again.

Yet, one hundred eighty-eight years after the publication of Notre Dame de Paris, Victor Hugo’s ominous words feel eerily true again tonight. Today, as I watched the Cathedral burn, the Gothic spire fall, and the medieval roof collapse, I cried for the destruction of history, art, and sacred space. Today, as I answered concerned texts, phone calls, emails, and social media messages from friends and former students near and far, my heart swelled with love and appreciation. Tonight, as I watched the news that the structure and much of the artwork of the Cathedral has been saved and that, once again, just as in the time of Victor Hugo, the faithful of the world will unite to restore this spiritual and cultural treasure, I am hopeful.

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This photo was taken 6 weeks ago. You can see the scaffolding of the restauration project that may have been the cause of the fire.

This photo was taken 6 weeks ago. You can see the scaffolding of the restauration project that may have been the cause of the fire.

The roof and spire that collapsed today

The roof and spire that collapsed today

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French Friday: Les Fontaines Wallace aka Paris Bubblers

“Si vous rencontrez une fontaine, ne passer pas sans vous y abreuver.” - Denis Lapointe

Wallace Fountain — Place Saint-Sulpice

Wallace Fountain — Place Saint-Sulpice

During the Siege of Paris in 1870 and the ensuing Commune, many of Paris’ aqueducts were destroyed. As a result water was drawn directly from the Seine and sold for exorbitant prices. The water was so dirty that it was actually safer and cheaper to drink alcoholic beverages, leading to even greater social and economic issues. In an effort to provide free potable water, philanthropist, Sir Richard Wallace (1818–1890), designed and funded the construction of sixty-seven drinking fountains around the city. The dark green fountains display four caryatids representing kindness, simplicity, charity, and sobriety. Each one is different from her sisters by the way she bends her knees and where her tunic is tucked into her blouse. The water comes from the center of the dome and falls down into a basin that is protected by a grille. Originally, each fountain included two tin-plated, iron cups attached by a small chain, but they were removed in 1952 for hygiene reasons. Most of the fountains still distribute perfectly potable water from March through November.

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Wallace Fountain in front of Shakespeare and Company

Wallace Fountain in front of Shakespeare and Company

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Wallace Fountain — Champs-Élysées

Wallace Fountain — Champs-Élysées

PARIS’ 67 WALLACE FOUNTAINS:

  • 3rd arrondissement: Boulevard de Sébastopol, square Chautemps; Passage du Pont aux biches; Rue de la corderie, place Nathalie Lemel

  • 4th arrondissement: Place Louis Lépine, next to the Chambre de Commerce; Place Louis Lépine, next to the Hôtel-dieu; 7, Boulevard du Palais; 123, rue Saint-Antoine; Small models: Place Louis Lepine; Quai de la Corse

  • 5th arrondissement: Rue Poliveau, face rue de l'Essai; 37, rue de la Bûcherie (Shakespeare and Company), Rue des Patriarches; Wall-mounted: Intersection of Rue Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire and Rue Cuvier

  • 6th arrondissement: Place Saint-Germain-des-Prés; Place Saint-Sulpice; Pont Neuf, Quai des Grands Augustins; Rue Vavin, at rue Bréa; Place Saint-André-des-Arts; Esplanade Pierre-Vidal-Naquet

  • 7th arrondissement: Small model - Place des Invalides

  • 8th arrondissement: Rue de St-Pétersbourg, at rue de Turin; Av. des Champs-Élysées, Chevaux de Marly (north side); Av. des Champs-Élysées, Chevaux de Marly (south side)

  • 9th arrondissement: Place Gustave Toudouze; Place de Budapest

  • 10th arrondissement: Place Juliette Dodu; Place Jacques Bonsergent; Place Robert Desnos

  • 11th arrondissement: 143, rue de la Roquette; 197, Boulevard Voltaire; 44, rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud; 94, rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud; 1, Boulevard Richard Lenoir; 89, Boulevard Richard Lenoir; Small models: 32, boulevard Richard Lenoir; 74, boulevard Richard Lenoir

  • 12th arrondissement: Cours de Vincennes, face Blvd de Picpus, Angle de St-Mandé; at rue du Rendez-vous; Rue Descot, face Mairie du XIIe arrondissement; boulevard Menilmontant

  • 13th arrondissement: 82, avenue d'Italie; Rue de la Butte-aux-cailles, at rue de l'Espérance; ZAC Baudricourt, at avenue d'Ivry; Small model: Place Paul Verlaine

  • 14th arrondissement: Avenue Reille, at avenue René Coty; Place Jules Hénaffe; Place Edgard quinet, at rue de la Gaîté; Place Denfert-Rochereau, at Blvd Raspail; Avenue du Maine, face Mairie du XIVè arrondissement

  • 15th arrondissement: Place Henri Rollet; 2, boulevard Pasteur; Place du Général Beuret; Place Charles Vallin; Small models: Place Alain Chartier; Place Saint Charles; 19, Place du Commerce; 35, boulevard Pasteur

  • 16th arrondissement: 10, boulevard Delessert; 194, avenue de Versailles; Place Jean Lorrain; Place de Passy; Place du Père Marcellin Campagnat; Esplanade Pierre-Vidal-Naquet; Colonnaded: Rue de Rémusat, at Rue de Mirabeau

  • 17th arrondissement: 112, avenue de Villiers; Place Aimé Maillard; 15, avenue Niel; 1, avenue de Wagram; 112, boulevard des Batignolles; Small model: Place de Lévis; Colonnaded: Avenue des Ternes, at Place Pierre Demours

  • 18th arrondissement: Place Emile Goudeau; 42, boulevard Rochechouart; Rue Saint-Eleuthère, at rue Azaïs; Place des Abbesses; Rue de la Goutte d'or, at rue de Chartres

  • 19th arrondissement: 214, boulevard de la Villette; 139, Rue Meaux at Rue du Rhi

  • 20th arrondissement: Place Édith Piaf; 6, rue Eugène Belgrand; 29, boulevard de Ménilmontant; Place Maurice Chevalier; Rue Piat, face au square

French Friday: Je pense à toi sans cesse...

« Paris sera toujours Paris. Qu’est-ce que tu veux qu’il fasse d’autre ? » - Fréderic Dard

Tour Eiffel w/ green bench

On se rappelle les chansons, un soir d'hiver, un frais visage, la scène à marchands de marrons, une chambre au cinquième étage, les cafés crèmes du matin, Montparnasse, le Café du Dôme, les faubourgs, le Quartier latin, les Tuileries et la Place Vendôme.

Paris, c'était la gaieté, Paris, c'était la douceur aussi. C'était notre tendresse. Paris, tes gamins, tes artisans, tes camelots et tes agents, et tes matins de printemps. Paris, l'odeur de ton pavé d'oies, de tes marronniers, du bois. Je pense à toi sans cesse. Paris, je m'ennuie de toi, mon vieux. On se retrouvera tous les deux, mon grand Paris.

Évidemment, il y a parfois les heures un peu difficiles, mais tout s'arrange bien, ma foi. Avec Paris, c'est si facile. Pour moi, Paris, c'est les beaux jours, les airs légers, graves, ou tendres. Pour moi, Paris, c'est mes amours et mon cœur ne peut se reprendre.

Paris, c'était la gaieté, Paris, c'était la douceur aussi. C'était notre tendresse. Paris, tes gamins, tes artisans, tes camelots et tes agents, et tes matins de printemps. Paris, l'odeur de ton pavé d'oies, de tes marronniers, du bois. Je pense à toi sans cesse. Paris, je m'ennuie de toi, mon vieux. On se retrouvera tous les deux, mon grand Paris. - Paris, chanté par Édith Piaf

French Friday: Fleurs fanées

« Sache que la fleur la plus belle est aussi la plus tôt fanée. Sur son parfum penche-toi vit. L’immortelle n’a pas d’odeur. »

- André Gide

It’s one of the things I love most about Paris — you never know when you’re going to stumble upon something beautiful. On the morning of my birthday, we were walking down the rue Cambon to pay our respects to  Karl  at Chanel when we witnessed the changing of the  fleurs.  Apparently these lovely white tulips (my favorites!), pale pink ranunculus, and purple and white anemones were too wilted to stand before the formidable Mademoiselle so they were replaced with fresh white hydrangeas (another favorite) and calla lilies (not a fan). Still, I couldn’t help but feel like these discarded beauties were like a birthday bouquet that are now preserved forever in my memory and on my blog.

It’s one of the things I love most about Paris — you never know when you’re going to stumble upon something beautiful. On the morning of my birthday, we were walking down the rue Cambon to pay our respects to Karl at Chanel when we witnessed the changing of the fleurs. Apparently these lovely white tulips (my favorites!), pale pink ranunculus, and purple and white anemones were too wilted to stand before the formidable Mademoiselle so they were replaced with fresh white hydrangeas (another favorite) and calla lilies (not a fan). Still, I couldn’t help but feel like these discarded beauties were like a birthday bouquet that are now preserved forever in my memory and on my blog.

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Week 10 - Storytelling: Hometown

“America is my country, and Paris is my home town.” - Gertrude Stein

#2019dogwood52 #dogwood52 #dogwoodweek10

#2019dogwood52 #dogwood52 #dogwoodweek10

“I had spent enough time in France to know that the words 'chez moi' meant something a thousand times more profound than one's current home. 'Chez moi' was the place your parents came from, or maybe even the region of your parents' parents. The food you ate at Christmas, your favorite kind of cheese, your best childhood memories of summer vacation -- all of these derived from 'chez moi.' And even if you had never lived there, 'chez moi' was knitted into your identity; it colored the way you viewed the world and the way the world viewed you.” ― Ann Mah, The Lost Vintage

French Friday: Les Parapluies - Village Royal

« L'esprit humain est comme un parapluie : il marche mieux lorsqu'il est ouvert. » - Darry Cowl

Imagined by the artist Patricia Cunha, the exhibition Umbrella Sky is installed in Le Royal Village from February through April 2019. “Color life!” is the leitmotiv. About 800 colorful umbrellas, suspended in the air all along the passage, bring joy and vitality. Inspired by Mary Poppins, this poetic installation will not leave you indifferent. #levillageroyal #umbrellasky (Source: http://v2.villageroyal.com/2019/02/21/umbrella-sky-by-le-village-royal/)

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Le Village Royal, in collaboration with Galeries Bartoux, is pleased to present the monumental artworks of the Belgian artist Dirk De Keyzer. Discover a carousel of dreams and poetry from February 5th to April 28th, 2019. Like articulated puppets, Chevaliette, Zalangou, and Zalando seem to come to life at any time. With a recognizable style, both fantastic and universal, Dirk De Keyzer mixes cultures from all over the world with human feelings such as the quest for happiness, beauty and harmony.

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